Strong Aussie dollar hammers Australian screen production

Pop star Rihanna in uniform on the shoot of Peter Berg's Battleship. The big-budget movie was scheduled for production in Australia but was moved to Louisiana owing to the strong Australilan dollar and attractive production subsidies from the US state.

When Alex Burns and I set out to examine the past two decades of Australian screen policy, we concluded that the biggest influence on the success or failure of the Australian film industry was macro-economic factors like currency fluctuations – and not the perceived quality of Australian writers or directors.

You can read that paper – “Boom and Bust in Australian Screen Policy: 10BA, the Film Finance Corporation and Hollywood’s ‘Race to the Bottom‘” in the August issue of Media International Australia, reposted by Alex in proof version here.

Recent developments have only reinforced our findings. Yesterday, for instance, the Australian Financial Review published a feature-length article about the serious trouble posed for that the export-intensive parts of Australian screen industry by the strong Australian dollar, which briefly reached parity with the US dollar last week.

You can’t read the AFR article (by Brook Turner, entitled ‘Dollar dampens local film production’) online, so I’ve transcribed important sections below:

 

 

 

For the first  time in decades there are no major American films being made in Australia, and none in the pipeline, a clear sign of the devastation the dollar has wrought on a $2.3 billion business.

NSW hasn’t had had a major US  film since Wolverine wrapped at Fox Studios in mid-2008, Victoria since Don’t Be Afraid of the Dark in September last year, Queensland since Narnia last November. The Sunshine State is hanging in thanks to local production and Steven Spielberg’s 13-part, $150-million TV dinosaur epic Terra Nova. But there are fears that may go the way of films such as Green Lantern and Battleship, which migrated back to the US with their $US150 million budgets ass the dollar rose, as estimated $200 million loss to the Australian industry.

“This is unprecedented”, Ausfilm’s chief operating officer Tracey Vieira, said this week from Los Angeles, where she has the job of enticing US production to Australia. “We have always had a good momentum of production inquiry about filming in Australia; I’ve never been in a position where we haven’t had a US production that is seriously considering Australia. And there’s nothing in sight.”

Ausfilm hass asked the federal government to at least double Australia’s production offset – a 15% tax rebate on local expenditure on foreign films – to bring it into line with North American, UK and European competitors as part of the government’s independent film sector review, due later this year.

The article reinforces the problems faced by Australia’s screen industry, which features anaemic levels of locally-financed production and is heavily reliant on “runaway production” from Hollywood studios. As we pointed out in the paper, Australia’s foreign-financed production is highly vulnerable to currency fluctuations and “race to the bottom” competition from other jurisdictions offering their own generous production subsidies.

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2 thoughts on “Strong Aussie dollar hammers Australian screen production

  1. Pingback: Ben Eltham on Currency Fluctuations and Australian Screen Production | Alex Burns

  2. Pingback: Securing the Future | nmiljevic

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